Do I Matter?, by Jacqueline DeSelms-Wolfe

Do I Matter?, by Jacqueline DeSelms-Wolfe

I received a postcard the other day. I was excited. I thought a friend had visited a cool and exotic place and had thought of me while there. 

Then I read it. 

Dear Jacqueline,

My name is Brent* and we don’t know each other. I have been praying for you morning and evening for the last 30 days. 

May the peace and goodness of the Lord be with you and all you love. 

Brent (Awaken Nashville)

At first, it confused me. Then a strange “invaded” sort of feeling came over me, not unlike I’ve experienced when something of mine has been stolen. That invaded feeling turned into anger.

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Forgiveness, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Forgiveness, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

“Forgiveness is nothing less than the way we heal the world".

   -- Desmond Tutu, The Book of Forgiveness 

I was a terrible oldest sister.
 
In our dysfunctional family filled with addiction and anger, yet held together in intense love and loyalty, I raged and cried and felt isolated.

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Loving Him/Her As Myself, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Loving Him/Her As Myself, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

This is not my first rodeo into this realm of the feminist movement.

Last time we demanded that men change, declared our sexual freedom, decided to make ourselves happy instead of waiting for “HIM” to make me happy, and burned our bras.  OHHH. . . the freedom we thought we had found.

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Letting Go, by guest blogger David Saffold

The following is my sixth entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 6 is found in Chapter 6 (Into Action), first paragraph on page 76 of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  “We have emphasized willingness as being indispensable.  Are we now ready to let God remove from us all the things which we have admitted are objectionable?  Can God now take them all – every one?  If we still cling to something we will not let go, we ask God to help us be willing.”

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Restoring Sanity, by guest blogger David Saffold

The following is my second entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 2:  “Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.”

In step 1, discussed previously, we discovered that we were hopelessly powerless to stop using a substance that was destructive to our lives.  We were strangely “insane” in that we couldn't or wouldn't stop using a substance that was poisoning our physical and emotional health and ruining all that we held dear in life.

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