Awareness

Awareness, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Awareness, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Before my mother died she said to me; “I wish you could stop trying to fix yourself!  Why can’t you just be more like me?!”

I have a dining room cupboard filled with dishes and china from relatives who have long since died.  I never fully thought about whose they were because my younger sister remembered it all.
She died six years ago.
 

Energy Healing, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Energy Healing, by Susan Austin-Crumpton
Our biological rhythms are the symphony of the cosmos,
Music embedded deep within us to which we dance,
Even when we can’t name the tune.          --Deepak Chopra

What is energy healing?
 
When I was a child it always felt like I was being accompanied or “watched”!  Sometimes I would hear my name called or other lovely sounds that no one else seemed to notice.  My conclusion was that I must be crazy and needed to keep this observance secret.

The Kingdom of God, by guest blogger Gail Cooney

Tonight at my bible study group, we were talking about worship. One of the qualities of worship that I identify with is an awareness of God's presence in my life.  I started thinking about the way Jesus talks of the Kingdom of God as something we experience on earth, not just something known after our death.  It feels like a parallel universe and we strive to be aware of it and live both at the same time.

Relationship With Myself, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Relationship With Myself, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

I hate that I feel irritated and notice that the pictures hang crooked in my office and in my home. I wait in line at the grocery feeling none of the “goodness” of buying organic foods that others seem to be secretly smiling about.  I listen to a righteous diatribe about why “my smoking is not hurting anyone but myself” and I think of that person’s children, and parents, and spouse and friends.

I am judging, critical and negative.

Love and Tolerance of Others, by guest blogger, David Saffold

The following is my tenth entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 10:  “Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.”
 
Step 10 is found in Chapter 6 (Into Action), page 84, third paragraph through page 85, third paragraph of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  I will let the literature do most of the talking here. “Step 10 suggests we continue to take personal inventory and set right any new mistakes as we go along.  We vigorously commenced this way of living as we cleaned up the past.  We have entered the world of the Spirit.  Our next function is to grow in understanding and effectiveness.  This is not an overnight matter.  It should continue for our lifetime.  Continue to watch for selfishness, dishonesty, resentment, and fear.  When they crop up, we ask God at once to remove them.  We discuss them with someone immediately and make amends quickly if we have harmed anyone… Love and tolerance of others is our code.

The Organizing Principle, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

The Organizing Principle, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

The organizing principle of my daily life is I go to work most days, visit with family and friends on weekends, travel and enjoy my husband.  A pretty simple organizing principle.

 

Searching for Wisdom, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Searching for Wisdom, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

I want wisdom, and truth, and my authentic self. I often feel all of that when I am sitting with a client in a session and our truths meet one another. Then, a third thing happens that is mostly experienced as fulfillment, satisfaction, and completion. I fall in love with the process and with my client. In those moments, I fall in love with my life!

On Pain and Paying Attention, by guest blogger Carolyn M. Evertson

Julia Cameron, the noted writer, talks about synchronicity …two or more things that are apparently unrelated or unlikely to occur by chance, yet are experienced as occurring together. In her book, The Artist’s Way, just as I was struggling with psychic pain so intense that I was lost as to what to do, I read Julia’s book it and came to a part that was so stunningly relevant to pain’s place in my life that I had to write it down.