Healing

Forgiveness, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Forgiveness, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

“Forgiveness is nothing less than the way we heal the world".

   -- Desmond Tutu, The Book of Forgiveness 

I was a terrible oldest sister.
 
In our dysfunctional family filled with addiction and anger, yet held together in intense love and loyalty, I raged and cried and felt isolated.

5 Minutes a Day, by guest blogger Jacqueline DeSelms-Wolfe

I went to see my psychiatrist a few weeks ago for the sole purpose of having her increase my anti-depressants. I walk in confidently, sit down and tell her, "I need to up my medication. I have been depressed. I think I need the change." 

She smiles and says, "How is your yoga going?"

Reframing the Shadowed Life: On Being Abled, by Larkin Oates, MFA, MA

Reframing the Shadowed Life: On Being Abled, by Larkin Oates, MFA, MA

A few years ago I happened across a radio interview, “Losses and the Laughter We Grow Into;” with author, storyteller, funny and wise man Kevin Kling and Krista Tippet (On Being).

At that time, I thought about the way in which Kling conveys his experience of being ‘dis-abled’. He said that in Dante‘s epic journeys, ‘Dis’ is “the underworld of shadow and reflection.” Kling therefore translates his experience as, “being abled through the world of shadow and reflection.” I embrace his reframe, because I too am abled, in my own way. In fact, many can relate, especially as we age and experience changes to our own abilities.

Creating Community and Connection: Finding My Tribe, by Larkin Oates

Creating Community and Connection: Finding My Tribe, by Larkin Oates

Carrying a basket of striped sock monkeys and assorted stuffed animals, I grab my tea and enter the casual lounge space. The three people wait as I then settle into my seat. We gather here because one woman dared to ask for help when experiencing personal despair. Specifically, she asked us to facilitate an intensive daylong inward journey.

Admitting Our Wrongs, by guest blogger David Saffold

The following is my fifth entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 5:  “Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.”

Step 5 is found in Chapter 6 (Into Action) page 72 through page 75 of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  In step 4 we discovered the deeper causes in our nature that were creating our problems.  Now we need to start the process of healing by telling them to another person.  We have to stop hiding from life and others, we have to finally find the courage to remove our mask and be entirely honest with another person.  The book gives the reason why this is so important on page 73; “More than most people, the alcoholic leads a double life.  They are very much the actor.  To the outer world they present a stage character.  This is the one they want others to see.”  This mask or “stage character” is the lie that is presented to the world and the alcoholic is terrified that the lie will be discovered.  This makes for a life of constant fear and tension which empowers the addictive behavior.

Kabbalah and The Mystery of Life, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Kabbalah and The Mystery of Life, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

I was searching for something. I was not sure what. It was like standing in front of a spiritual cupboard wanting “that something” I could not identify. Years and years of standing there searching to find solace for my soul.

I Am Not Who You Think I Am! , by guest blogger Charlotte Mabry, Ed.D.

I Am Not Who You Think I Am! , by guest blogger Charlotte Mabry, Ed.D.

I may look like just another 63 year old chubbette to some of you as body parts drop and gray invades my hair. I assure you inside I am a jock, a ballet dancer, a comedian, a mistress of the universe, your dream friend and your worst nightmare. I am woman hear me roar, and whine and whimper.

Finding Zen, by Laurette Yund, BSN, MHS

Finding Zen, by Laurette Yund, BSN, MHS

The only Zen you find on the tops of mountains is the Zen you bring up there.

                                                   - Robert M. Pirsig            

I have been a seeker since early childhood.  I grew up in a strict Catholic home and was  ecstatic when introduced as a young teenager to Eastern philosophy and other non-Christian ideas – what an eye opener!

Embracing the Healing Time, by Laurette Yund, BSN, MHS

Embracing the Healing Time, by Laurette Yund, BSN, MHS

I was deeply moved when I read the following poem by Pesha Joyce Gertler.  Her story resonated with my own life experience, bringing sadness and regret, until the last words lifted me high with compassion and love.  And I looked at my life with fresh eyes, with acceptance, embracing this too is God.