Finding Peace, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Finding Peace, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

It feels like as an elder in this community, I am being called upon to hold on even more tightly to the inner unity I have already found, rather than convincing others that I am right politically and socially.
 
It is disturbing to me to experience the violence and meanness that is so prevalent in the political world.  I don’t understand the divisiveness of racism, sexism, xenophobia etc.

Read More

Surrender, by Maureen Doyle, MAT

Surrender, by Maureen Doyle, MAT

Surrender is not a word that I like to use. It conjures up thoughts of giving in, someone else taking control, not winning. I am a strong person and I used to believe that to surrender was a sign of weakness and that was the last thing that I want to be seen as – weak.

Read More

Admitting Our Wrongs, by guest blogger David Saffold

The following is my fifth entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 5:  “Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.”

Step 5 is found in Chapter 6 (Into Action) page 72 through page 75 of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  In step 4 we discovered the deeper causes in our nature that were creating our problems.  Now we need to start the process of healing by telling them to another person.  We have to stop hiding from life and others, we have to finally find the courage to remove our mask and be entirely honest with another person.  The book gives the reason why this is so important on page 73; “More than most people, the alcoholic leads a double life.  They are very much the actor.  To the outer world they present a stage character.  This is the one they want others to see.”  This mask or “stage character” is the lie that is presented to the world and the alcoholic is terrified that the lie will be discovered.  This makes for a life of constant fear and tension which empowers the addictive behavior.

Read More

Making a Commitment, by guest blogger David Saffold

The following is my third entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 3:  “Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.”
 
In Step 2 we came to believe (see previous blog), now we make a commitment.  Continuing our reading in The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous, we find Step 3 in chapter 5 (How It Works) on page 63.  It takes the form of a prayer: “God, I offer myself to Thee, to build with me and to do with me as Thou wilt.  Relieve me of the bondage of self that I may better do Thy will.  Take away my difficulties, that victory over them may bear witness to those I would help of Thy Power, Thy Love, and Thy Way of life. May I do Thy will always.”  The wording is optional as long as it expresses the idea.  I find this to be a beautiful prayer and very effective when voiced with conviction.

Read More

Kabbalah Gratitude for The Estuary, by Molly Brown, Guest Blogger and School of Healing Arts Student

This is a letter written to Estuary Founder and Executive Director, Susan Austin-Crumpton from Molly Brown, her student of many years:

I have felt compelled to write you all morning so that’s what I’m doing. I just have to share my experience with you and the second phase of what I believe are new beginnings.  Last night when I got home I felt the most profound peace, warmth and gratitude that I have had in a long time thanks to The Estuary. 

Read More

Living in the Future, by Jenny Emerson, LMFT, LMT

Living in the Future, by Jenny Emerson, LMFT, LMT

Have you ever clung to the verse Jeremiah 29:11 "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future."  The word prosper is very alluring. What if the plans for me are to be wealthy? Wow, I can't wait for that!  How about you?

 

Read More