Strength

It Was Me All Along, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

It Was Me All Along, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

I was backpacking alone in Utah, carrying a huge pack on my skinny hips that looked like raw meat.  I felt invincible, capable, with every step validating that there is nothing I can’t do. I loved it! That was many years ago.

Surrender, by Maureen Doyle, MAT

Surrender, by Maureen Doyle, MAT

Surrender is not a word that I like to use. It conjures up thoughts of giving in, someone else taking control, not winning. I am a strong person and I used to believe that to surrender was a sign of weakness and that was the last thing that I want to be seen as – weak.

Self Care in the Digital Age, by Larkin Oates, MA

Self Care in the Digital Age, by Larkin Oates, MA

Occasionally, managing e-mails and photo storage is overwhelming, and the delusion that I am succeeding at the task evaporates.  During a recent bout editing three storage Clouds, I found Charlotte Kasl’s book, "If the Buddha Got Stuck:  A Handbook for Change on a Spiritual Path."

Reframing the Shadowed Life: On Being Abled, by Larkin Oates, MFA, MA

Reframing the Shadowed Life: On Being Abled, by Larkin Oates, MFA, MA

A few years ago I happened across a radio interview, “Losses and the Laughter We Grow Into;” with author, storyteller, funny and wise man Kevin Kling and Krista Tippet (On Being).

At that time, I thought about the way in which Kling conveys his experience of being ‘dis-abled’. He said that in Dante‘s epic journeys, ‘Dis’ is “the underworld of shadow and reflection.” Kling therefore translates his experience as, “being abled through the world of shadow and reflection.” I embrace his reframe, because I too am abled, in my own way. In fact, many can relate, especially as we age and experience changes to our own abilities.

Your Humble Request, by guest blogger, David Saffold

The following is my seventh entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 7:  “Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.”
 
Step 7 is found in Chapter 6 (Into Action), page 76, second paragraph of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  “When ready, we say something like this:  My Creator, I am now willing that you should have all of me, good and bad.  I pray that You now remove from me every single defect of character which stands in the way of my usefulness to you and my fellows.  Grant me strength as I go out from here to do your bidding, Amen.  We have now completed Step 7.”

Fully Facing Ourselves, by guest blogger, David Saffold

The following is my fourth entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 4:  “Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.”
 
Step 4 is found in Chapter 5 (How It Works) page 63, last paragraph, through page 71 of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  We are to take a personal inventory in order to “face, and be rid of, the things in ourselves which have been blocking us.  Our addiction is but a symptom.  We had to get down to causes and conditions”.  Searching and fearless means thorough and honest.  We cover our entire life, past and present, leaving nothing out, exhausting everything we can bring to consciousness.  Having set a firm foundation in Step 3, we now have the courage and strength to look within and shine light on the true causes of our problems.  What we discover we write down.  We search through every emotional aspect of our lives, resentments (anger), shame/guilt (I am a bad person/what I did was bad), fear (stress, tension, anxiety, terror) and all of our life situations: relationships (sex/people/institutions), work/career (people and institutions), finances (beliefs and fear around money), spiritual (God/religion), health (physical/mental health problems).  We look at our life events, real and imagined, how and why we were threatened by what we believed was happening, and how our actions and reactions created or contributed to the destructive outcome for ourselves and others.
 

Acceptance in Waiting, by Andrea Pizzano, MMFT

Acceptance in Waiting, by Andrea Pizzano, MMFT

I recently thought about the difference between being stuck verses being in waiting when life presents us with challenges. There are many times I've felt stuck and alone with no choices.

The Tornadoes of our Lives, by Jenny Emerson, LMFT, LMT

The Tornadoes of our Lives, by Jenny Emerson, LMFT, LMT

The recent tornadoes in the Southeast remind me of my life. There have been some very dark days where everything got turned upside down. Times where I have lost a lot, if not practically everything. I have had to sort through the rubble. I have had to put the pieces back together.  I have had to rebuild my life.

Inner Safe Haven, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Inner Safe Haven, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

When I call for connection and no one comes it is terrifying.

I was born in a time when picking up babies and soothing them was considered “spoiling the child”.  With a bad case of colic I spent a lot of time crying, I am told, and no one coming.

I Am Not Who You Think I Am! , by guest blogger Charlotte Mabry, Ed.D.

I Am Not Who You Think I Am! , by guest blogger Charlotte Mabry, Ed.D.

I may look like just another 63 year old chubbette to some of you as body parts drop and gray invades my hair. I assure you inside I am a jock, a ballet dancer, a comedian, a mistress of the universe, your dream friend and your worst nightmare. I am woman hear me roar, and whine and whimper.