I Can Do Hard Things, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

I Can Do Hard Things, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

“Do I prefer to grow up and relate to life directly,
Or do I choose to live and die in fear?”
                                                         Pema Chodron

I can do hard things.
 
I didn’t know that when I was younger. I thought it was all about being talented, special, and somehow gifted. I knew I was not those things. So, I believed I could not do hard and difficult things.

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Truth Tellers, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Truth Tellers, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

I have been watching a special “comedy” routine by Hannah Gadsby. She is a wonderfully strong person who is intelligent, funny, well educated, and successful. She taught me lots about feeling connected in a way we all long for, beyond gender and power.
 

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Life Force, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Life Force, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

It seems much of my life has been filled with meaningless activity.  In my younger years, without much of me to operate with, I tried to please as I was hoping for value and purpose.  I worked at jobs I hated, tried to stay in struggling relationships for the “sake of the children”, and was mediocre at parenting.

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Creating Community and Connection: Finding My Tribe, by Larkin Oates

Creating Community and Connection: Finding My Tribe, by Larkin Oates

Carrying a basket of striped sock monkeys and assorted stuffed animals, I grab my tea and enter the casual lounge space. The three people wait as I then settle into my seat. We gather here because one woman dared to ask for help when experiencing personal despair. Specifically, she asked us to facilitate an intensive daylong inward journey.

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Admitting Our Wrongs, by guest blogger David Saffold

The following is my fifth entry in a series about the 12-step spiritual program of recovery.

Step 5:  “Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.”

Step 5 is found in Chapter 6 (Into Action) page 72 through page 75 of The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous.  In step 4 we discovered the deeper causes in our nature that were creating our problems.  Now we need to start the process of healing by telling them to another person.  We have to stop hiding from life and others, we have to finally find the courage to remove our mask and be entirely honest with another person.  The book gives the reason why this is so important on page 73; “More than most people, the alcoholic leads a double life.  They are very much the actor.  To the outer world they present a stage character.  This is the one they want others to see.”  This mask or “stage character” is the lie that is presented to the world and the alcoholic is terrified that the lie will be discovered.  This makes for a life of constant fear and tension which empowers the addictive behavior.

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Who I Am, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

Who I Am, by Susan Austin-Crumpton

“The Art of Connection is an energy and wisdom of the heart that includes personal vulnerability and will change the world.”

     - Miles Adcox, CEO, Onsite Workshops

I am often fearful of letting anyone hear who I truly am.  I open myself to the worst of all reactions from others… silence. There I write tragic and negative stories about the messages from the other person.

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